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Maintaining a hot bite - - - 16 messages. Showing 1 through 10. Go to page: 1   2 
CK
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Daily Subscription Msg 1 Posted: 06:51 PM 12/31/09 (CST)
How to maintain

A hot bite?

Try finesse



What a month it’s been on the ice. We have seen ice build really fast. We have also seen a big snow, which has created some slushy spots…yuck!

Now with the cold settling back in we should be seeing those areas refreeze…not soon enough for most of us I’m sure.

I hope you either pulled off your permanent shack or really blocked her up high.



Now that we do have some thicker ice and with it snow covered something is going to happen. The bite is going to tapper off. The reason for this negative attitude that the fish will display is this…. low oxygen content in the water.

You see weed growth creates oxygen in the water and being the sun cannot hit the weeds any longer these weeds start to die off. Fish will become negative in there movements and not feed too hard. They have the reserves built already from the feeding binge they went on last fall.



Add in high-pressure fronts and you’ve got a recipe for a really tough bite, but they still will feed. The trick here is to downsize. How many times have you said “I needed to use the smallest minnow in my bucket to catch them”?

I know that you need to get small or smaller than what you think is small.

Sometimes even my 100th oz hair jigs are too big. I may drop to a bait that is an 1/8th inch diameter and tip with a single euro larva….waxies on this day may be too big.

You’ll also notice if your using a flasher that these fish will not lift or if they do they will not cover your bait. A dead stick may be the tactic on a tough bite like this.



Fish can most often always be caught, but the trick to getting that bite may take more than drowning big minnows.

Here’s where a flasher like what Marcum makes really aides you. You can see exactly how those fish are reacting. Which if you understand what you are looking at then allows you to attack those fish a bit differently until you develop a pattern that works.



Another piece of gear that really helps detect the lightest of bites are spring bobbers.

Properly installed and set with the right amount of weight you’ll see those super light downward ticks or better yet an up hit as well.

I’ve also found that holding the rod across my body at about a 30-degree angle I can watch the side view of the spring instead of holding the rod straight away and looking over the top of the spring. You may not even see the hit, but if you think the fish is on you can slowly lift your rod tip and watch for that spring to load up.

As I lift if that spring moves I’m rearing!



One of the other really important items in finesse fishing is line diameter.

I see a ton of guys using 4-test monofilament for pan fish. The issue here is when you drop to these super small baits there is not enough weight to get the coil out of the line.

Imagine fishing in 25-30 feet of water. The line coils all the way down. This coil will act like a shock absorber. You’ll never see a hit on a spring with that coil soaking up the pulling of that fish. Sure it may engulf that bait, but then you just got lucky too.

I’m a big fan of copolymer. Next to nothing in line stretch and the diameters are much smaller. The line is also more supple aiding in the action of my light small baits.

Adding a loop knot for my horizontal presentations also is a key in aiding the bait to react or dance if you will as I’m lightly twitching my rod.

If the bait hangs up and down it’s vertical…if it hangs left to right it’s a horizontal bait.

Typically horizontals are dancers…I do like a good show!



So as we get more into the winter finesse fishing will become more important to land more fish more often.

Have fun on the ice!

God Bless

CK



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Logan
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Daily Subscription Msg 2 Posted: 08:53 PM 12/31/09 (CST)
good info CK!

You guys doing and more ckoutdoors get-togethers this winter?



CK
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Daily Subscription Msg 3 Posted: 12:22 AM 01/01/10 (CST)
Yes we are...mini gtg's all winter with the big one coming the 1st weekend in April....we will be targeting slabs and tullies.


CKOutdoors.com
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WebDude
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Daily Subscription Msg 4 Posted: 11:28 AM 01/01/10 (CST)
Good read, CK!



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Odin
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Daily Subscription Msg 5 Posted: 05:01 PM 01/01/10 (CST)
I'm curious as why an underwater camera wouldnt be a better choice than a flasher, given that it allows you to see fish take the bait, particularly in winter when water clarity is usually better. Are the tiniest jigs too small to show up on camera?

You can buy an Aqua-vu Scout for $99. What does the cheapest Marcum flasher sell for?
CK
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Daily Subscription Msg 6 Posted: 09:47 PM 01/01/10 (CST)
A camera is set at a certain depth. When I'm working the entire water column having a camera to raise and lower plus trying to keep the bait in view would be nearly impossible.
A flasher works on real time and in most all of the best fishers gear you'll find flashers not cameras as there mode of seeing the fish.

Cameras are cool and fun to watch ,however the tool that will put more fish more often on your line is a flasher.
It's not about what the tool costs that says what you should buy.
They are two very different pieces of equipment used for two totally different applications.
This gill came from 2 foot off of the bottom today. It charged through 3 feet worth of fish to hit my bait which I was lifting working the top of the pack.
I saw it coming on my flasher and was ready for it.
Had I had a camera I would have never known it was there.





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Odin
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Daily Subscription Msg 7 Posted: 12:42 PM 01/02/10 (CST)
". . . in most all of the best fishers gear you'll find flashers not cameras as there mode of seeing the fish."

And you know this . . . how, exactly? What's the criteria for being among the "best" and how do you know the gear of most all of them? Do you consider yourself one of "the best"?

Most of the ice fishermen I know, admittedly probably not among the "best fishers" on the planet, use flashers not just to see fish but also to learn depths before drilling holes. Most of them also have underwater cameras they use, although cameras being a relatively new invention, it's plausible that many experts would rely more or solely on flashers.

Is your flasher sensitive enough that you can distinguish between average and bull-size bluegills?

As for keeping bait in view with a camera, it's easy to create the kind of rig I use video fishing to do that so the bait is always in view no matter where the camera is pointed, although the hole might have to be drilled bigger. The advantages to actually seeing how the fish react to various presentations are obvious.
sauzal1021
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Joined 12/16/2008
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Daily Subscription Msg 8 Posted: 08:42 PM 01/02/10 (CST)
Watch out CK, Odin it seems is looking for another argument.

Odin
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Daily Subscription Msg 9 Posted: 09:49 AM 01/03/10 (CST)
Actually, I'm seeking enlightenment. Someone who claims to know the gear of "most all of the best fishers" may be privvy to sources of knowledge I'm unaware of. Or he might be talking out of his rear. Hard to know without asking.

He seems inordinately proud of hand-sized bluegills. (The hold-the-fish-out-to-the-camera-to-make-it-look-bigger-trick probably mostly fools rubes.) The state record 'gill is 2 lbs, 13 oz. - that's a bull. I grew up fishing a farmpond that had bluegills over 1 lb. I consider those bulls too. The fish in his pics look to be about 3 to a lb., barely big enough to be worth cleaning.
Logan
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Daily Subscription Msg 10 Posted: 01:22 PM 01/03/10 (CST)
Odin... no one should have to defend the flasher to an ice fisherman.

Cameras have there place but they simply CAN NOT do the same things a flasher can.

The fact that you even question this makes me wonder if you ice fish at all?

BTW, I'm wondering how you set up a camera to see bottom type, bait movement and depth, the entire water column and all the suspended objects in that water column all at the same time, in real time.







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