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Brainerd man dies after ATV breaks through ice - - - 10 messages. Showing 1 through 10.
Iceman
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Daily Subscription Msg 1 Posted: 05:06 PM 12/10/06 (CST)
Brainerd man dies after ATV breaks through ice

The Associated Press
BRAINERD, Minn. — A 21-year-old man died Sunday after his four-wheeler broke through the ice on Round Lake north of Brainerd.

The victim's name was not immediately released.

The Crow Wing County Sheriff's Department said ATVs driven by the victim and a friend both broke through the ice around 11:30 a.m. The friend pulled himself out of the water.

Emergency workers found the victim's body about 50 minutes later in 19 feet of water. He was pronounced dead at the hospital in Brainerd.

The sheriff's department said the area where the men broke through the ice had been open water two days ago, and that on Sunday the ice in that area was only about a quarter-inch thick.

———

Information from: The Brainerd Daily Dispatch,







ryanc
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Daily Subscription Msg 2 Posted: 06:29 PM 12/10/06 (CST)
Maybe to much whight you could ride a bike??????????


SEE YOU NEXT TIME GOT TO GO


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Iceman
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Daily Subscription Msg 3 Posted: 09:01 AM 12/11/06 (CST)
and heres more to the story..

ATV PLUNGES THROUGH ICE
21-year-old man killed; another angler escapes serious injury
By MATT ERICKSON
Staff Writer
A rural Brainerd man, out for a day of fishing Sunday on Round Lake north of Brainerd, died after his four-wheeler broke through the ice and plunged into 19 feet of water.

The name of the victim wasn't released by the Crow Wing County Sheriff's Department Sunday afternoon. Family members Sunday night confirmed the victim was 21-year-old Tyler Magnan, who lived in Unorganized Territory north of Brainerd.

"He was just a downright good kid," said Magnan's mother, Monique. "He will be so missed."

Emergency personnel discussed the attempted rescue of a 21-year-old Brainerd man whose ATV broke through the ice Sunday on Round Lake. A State Patrol helicopter photographed the area on the lake where the victim and another man went through the ice.

A second man, whose name wasn't released but was a friend of Magnan's, also went through the ice on his ATV but was able to pull himself out of the lake, the Crow Wing County Sheriff's Department said. The two men were part of a larger group fishing and riding ATVs on the lake. Magnan and his friend were driving side by side when they broke through the ice several hundred yards from shore.

Nancy Vogt, the Magnan family's neighbor and close family friend of 14 years, spent time with the Magnan family Sunday night after learning of Tyler Magnan's death.

Family photo shows Tyler Magnan with a muskie he caught in August on Lake Vermillion. He was killed Sunday when the ATV he was driving plunged through the ice on Round Lake.

"They're just numb and in shock," said Vogt, a former Dispatch staff member who now is editor of the Lake Country Echo in Pequot Lakes. Vogt said Tyler Magnan lived for fishing in both summer and winter and knew Round Lake well.

Magnan and his friend had worked together at S & W Bait and Tackle near his home on Highway 371. S & W owner Sherree Wicktor, a friend of Magnan's family, said Tyler Magnan had an ice fishing house on Round Lake and both men were very familiar with the lake. She said they had checked ice thickness in several spots and on Sunday they simply used bad judgment in driving on that spot.

"It's just a reality, you have to be careful on the ice because you never know," Wicktor said. "These boys were not naive, they were not stupid. They knew about the ice and they knew how much ice they had out to their (ice) house."

Wicktor said reports of ice thickness on lakes throughout the Brainerd area were between 3 to 8 inches, and the men had 8 inches of ice from shore to their ice house. She said she also heard the ice was 8 inches thick around the area where the men broke through the ice. The area where they broke through the ice was about a quarter-inch thick, authorities said.

"You have to respect the ice, be scared of it all the time, take it seriously," Wicktor said.

Monique Magnan said her son loved the outdoors, especially hunting and fishing.

"He had been fishing for as long as he could hold a rod," Monique Magnan said. "It's not many people that get to find their passion. It was clear with him. It was kind of contagious because he got other people to fish who normally wouldn't."

About 11:30 a.m. Sunday dozens of emergency personnel from several area agencies responded to the Round Lake public access off Highway 371 after it was reported the men had broke through the ice. By 12:19 p.m., Crow Wing County Dive Team members found Magnan near his four-wheeler in 19 feet of water, said Assistant Brainerd Fire Chief Kevin Stunek.

Traffic was blocked on Highway 371 for about a mile in each direction as Magnan was carried from Round Lake to a North Ambulance helicopter, which launched from the highway. He was pronounced dead at St. Joseph's Medical Center in Brainerd.

Though freezing temperatures had been prevalent in the Brainerd area for the past week leading up to Friday - when temperatures reached the 30s - Stunek said caution still must be taken when venturing out on the ice.

"The ice isn't safe yet. People need be aware of that," Stunek said.

Crow Wing County Sheriff's Sgt. Phil Stoll, the county's boat and water supervisor, said two days ago the area where the men had broke through the ice was open water. He said on Sunday there was perhaps a quarter inch of ice at the spot.

"It was just glazed over," Stoll said.

The DNR recommends at least 4 inches of ice for walking, at least 5 inches for snowmobiles and ATVs and 8-12 inches for cars or small trucks. Stoll said anyone venturing out onto the ice should wear a life jacket under their coat, carry ice picks and use a chisel to test the ice as they proceed. The DNR also recommends checking with local bait shops or resorts for known thin ice areas.

But even in taking precautions, Stoll is quick to note that ice is never 100 percent safe.

"If you don't have to be out there, don't take the chance," Stoll said.

Assisting the sheriff's department were the Crow Wing County Dive Team, Brainerd Fire and Rescue with a hovercraft and other water rescue craft, the Nisswa Fire Department, the DNR, the State Patrol with a helicopter, the Pequot Lakes and Nisswa police departments, area first responders and North Ambulance.






CrappieKeith
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Daily Subscription Msg 4 Posted: 09:09 AM 12/11/06 (CST)
Thanks Iceman,just goes to show you need to know before you go.
not to be nasty but they did not check forthemselves.They said how thick is it & assumed all of the ice was that thick.
You need to stay to proven paths that others have gone before you before you just haul out a house.
This is such a negative for our sport.
I saw 2 vehicles in the ditch on deadmans curve. Should we stop driving.Be carefull should be the point not be scared. How can a guy have fun if he is scared.What a crock story writter.


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Iceman
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Daily Subscription Msg 5 Posted: 09:20 AM 12/11/06 (CST)
CK,
can you tell me a sport thats not negative ?

I'v fallen thought before it's not a fun thing to do belive me if i had it to do over agian i'd use the spud every step i made instead of every other step.
and i was walking the same ice as did the last few times..





CrappieKeith
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Daily Subscription Msg 6 Posted: 09:42 AM 12/11/06 (CST)
I'm not picking on you ,but rather the writter .Please read more carefully.

Wicktor said reports of ice thickness on lakes throughout the Brainerd area were between 3 to 8 inches, and the men had 8 inches of ice from shore to their ice house. She said she also heard the ice was 8 inches thick around the area where the men broke through the ice. The area where they broke through the ice was about a quarter-inch thick, authorities said.

"You have to respect the ice, be scared of it all the time, take it seriously," Wicktor said.


i doubt you could walk on a 1/4" of ice &be scared. My gun will kill ,am I scared? No ,but I'm respectfull & carefull.



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pastorlight52
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Daily Subscription Msg 7 Posted: 09:48 AM 12/11/06 (CST)
http://www.wcco.com/video/?id=22330@wcco.dayport.com

For those who did not see the news reports -- I do believe this link will take you to a WCCO video news report.

Seems to me the two young men where doing what they had been taught -travel together - check the ice on the lake -- others where with in ear or eye sight.

What I can not find is a bit more info on what happened when they went through. Why did one get out and the other not.

Let us all becareful and follow the best guidelines we have enjoying the sports we do.


If people concentrated on the really important stuff in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing rods.
Doug Larson



If people concentrated on the really important stuff in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing rods.
Doug Larson
pastorlight52
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Daily Subscription Msg 8 Posted: 09:58 AM 12/11/06 (CST)
Here is another article that came out just days before this past Sunday. As I remember -- every year the news goes out about being careful and reminding us of the dangers of early ice - -or ice in general.

Dec 5, 2006

You Pay The Price When You Fish On Thin Ice
(WCCO) The annual winter ritual of ice fishing is near for many hearty Minnesotans. It won't be long before ice shanties dot the state's 10,000 lakes as cold-weather anglers look for at least one, maybe two, healthy fresh-water specimens to hook, cook and eat.

Unfortunately, many impatient outdoor types may risk hypothermia, drowning, serious injury or even death because they dared to venture on a less than completely frozen icepack.

Appearances are deceiving. Tim Smalley, a water safety specialist for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) recently told WCCO This Morning that lake or pond ice should be at least four inches thick before sportsmen (or women) venture out, rod and reel in hand, and ask themselves, "Do I feel lucky?"

According to the Lifesaving Society, a Canadian lifeguards association, there were 22 ice-related deaths in Ontario in 1998, four of them related to ice fishing. They estimate from 4 to 5 people lose their lives in ice fishing-related deaths in North America every year. Furthermore, they and others discourage anglers from treading on river ice, which they say is weaker than pond ice.

Unfortunately, there are no high-tech gadgets or "ice sonar" tri-corders that allow ice fishers to point, aim and take a sounding. The low-tech methods of digging or boring a hole still prevail here.

"I know most of us think to ourselves, 'If I fell through, I'll just climb back onto the solid ice and be just fine'," Smalley said. But this is easier said than done. "If you knew you were going to break through, you wouldn't have walked there in the first place," he said.

The sudden shock of plunging into freezing water adds to the confusion and panic. "Cold water saps body heat 25 times faster than air of the same temperature. Just try holding your hand in a cooler full of ice water for more than a few seconds and you'll see what I mean," he said.

For that predicament, Smalley urges getting and using a pair of ice rescue picks or "claws" from a bait or fishing tackle dealer. Although it's nothing more than a pair of sharp spikes embedded in wooden or plastic handles, they provide a submerged fisherman his only opportunity to literally claw out of a deadly situation.

"This can be a fun project for young budding woodworkers with a little adult supervision," Smalley said.

How to make your own ice rescue picks:
• Get two four-inch pieces of wooden doweling the size of a broom handle or a little larger; they should be made out of material that floats in case you drop the claws into the water
• Drive a stout nail into one end of each dowel
• Use a file to sharpen the nail heads to a point
• Drill a hole into the dowels (in the end opposite the nail) and tie a length of strong cord through the hole so a pick is on each end "jump- rope" fashion; you may also drill a hole in the ends alongside the nails so the nail on the other pick can nest in the hole keeping both points covered.

The DNR offers this advice to people who fall through the ice:
• Keep ice picks in pocket for quick emergency access
• Try to remain calm
• Turn in the water towards the direction they came from, because that is probably the strongest ice
• Dig the points of the picks into the ice and while vigorously kicking feet; pull onto the surface by sliding forward on the ice
• Roll away from the area of weak ice; that will distribute weight to help avoid breaking through again
• Seek shelter, heat, warm dry clothing and warm, nonalcoholic and non-caffeinated drinks
• Have someone call 911 and seek medical attention if the victim becomes disoriented, has uncontrollable shivering, or exhibits any other ill effects that may be symptoms of hypothermia (the life threatening drop in the body's core temperature).

For more information, contact the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources for free ice safety and hypothermia prevention brochures.
• In the Twin Cities, call (651) 296-6157 or toll free 1-888-MINNDNR (646-6367)
• Or e-mail info@dnr.state.mn.us.





If people concentrated on the really important stuff in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing rods.
Doug Larson



If people concentrated on the really important stuff in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing rods.
Doug Larson
Iceman
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Daily Subscription Msg 9 Posted: 09:59 AM 12/11/06 (CST)
yea i know what you are talkiking about CK some writers don't know there *** from a hole in the ground.. wink smiley





CrappieKeith
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Daily Subscription Msg 10 Posted: 10:22 AM 12/11/06 (CST)
Gear is everything.Propperly geared we can be safe & comfortable outdoors.



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http://www.bucketrack.com/THEJig.html
IF IT'S WET...IT'S CATCH'N FISH
Brainerd man dies after ATV breaks through ice - - - 10 messages. Showing 1 through 10.
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