spring bobbers are deadly | Minnesota Fishing Forum

Fishing Reports Banner

Posts 1 through 6 for spring bobbers are deadly

     

New? - Register Here!

No Obligations - Click Here for more information. Login

Main Forum Page     |     Fishing Blogs     |     Find a Fishing Partner     |     My Fishing Pals Home     |     To The Top - Minnesota Fishing Forum
You Are Currently Viewing - Minnesota Fishing Forum  
spring bobbers are deadly - - - 6 messages. Showing 1 through 6.
CrappieKeith
Senior Member
Joined 03/27/2006
Posts:3862

CrappieKeith's blogs, pictures and recent posts
Daily Subscription Msg 1 Posted: 01:43 PM 10/11/06 (CST)
I was poking around today and ran into this about spring bobbers. With ice comming soon ,I thought I'd take the time to get you guys set up.Here is how I see it in this article.He uses bait ,but it's the same.

There is another read on springs that sounds like the guys on the lake.They rise ,but no hits.You should read this.

Spring Bobbers For Mid-Winter Gills
By: Jeff Evraets
Have you ever been out ice fishing and wondered how many times a bluegill would swim up to your bait, reject it, and swim away without you knowing they were there? From talking to many fishermen and women over the years I have found that the reason most of us have a hard time catching bluegills during mid winter is not necessarily due to the fish not being hungry. Instead, It is because we are not using equipment sensitive enough to pick up on light hits. And I do mean light hits.

Recently I found a way to help us have a better opportunity of catching the fish that do come up to investigate our offerings. Here's what I found.

We all understand that the metabolism of fish, bluegills included, slows way down during winter. This simply means that the fish needs less food to survive. Because of this, you will, as a rule, not find the gills attacking your bait as they did last summer. Instead, I have found on many occasions that the bluegills will swim up to the bait, examine it, even suck it in and taste it, without moving the smallest of bobbers. I the fisherman never knew they were there!

What to do about this you ask? Get rid of the old round bobbers! Really, I have found that something called a spring bobber will be the only way to detect these light hits. I'm sure that many of you have heard about this style of bobber but, have you tried it?

Here is why I think the spring bobber works better than the traditional round bobbers. First, the spring bobber offers almost no resistence to the fish. Second, A spring bobber is capable of detecting a fish sucking in the bait. This is the key. Because the spring bobber is controlled only by the weight of the bait, it is allowed room to move when a fish inhales it. The bobber can move down, indicating that the fish is moving away with the bait. Or, it can move up. Signaling that the fish has inhaled the bait.

Consider the set up for a traditional round bobber. You determine the depth that you want to fish at. You take the line and wrap it around the hook of the bobber. Then you let out some slack line so the fish can "run" with it. Then sit back and wait, jigging the bait when you get bored. By having the slack line you take away the ability of the bobber to detect upward movement of your bait. This the crucial key to winter fishing. If you want to catch more bluegills during mid winter ice fishing you need to change your set up.

Here is the set up I use when fishing a spring bobber. After determining the depth to fish at. I set my pole on a five gallon bucket and adjust the weight of my line so the bobber moves downward about half way. This will allow detection in both directions. If the bobber moves up I know that a fish has inhaled my offering. If it moves down I know the fish is swimming away with the bait. It really is this easy. Remember that these fish are not very hungry, so don't put any extra weight on the line. You need the offering to be as natural as possible. If I need to add weight I will very often take a size BB split shot and cut it in half with a sharp knife, and use it.

As I stated earlier, many times during winter this is how a bluegill will take your offering. It will swim up and very gently suck in the wax worm, grub, or whatever you are using. Because the round bobbers do not have the ability to detect upward movement, you never knew they were there. Remember, the fish are not going to be active most of the time. You will need to entice them into eating something they really don't need to eat. I really think that using a spring bobber will increase the amount of fish you detect. Whether or not you catch them depends on how you react.


Fishing with Spring Bobbers

Our Outdoors
Nick Simonson


The author with a pair of 10 inch perch that were caught recently, thanks to the bite detecting abilities of a spring bobber.
I cannot recall how many times I have watched fish rise up on the Vexilar as I work my lure in the water column only to have the fish pause at my offering then head back to the bottom. Be it a small jig with a wax worm or a spoon with a minnow head, it is frustrating to have fish attracted to a lure, but not hit it.

A few weeks ago, while fishing near Park Rapids, Minn., I watched several crappies rise and disappear on my sonar readout. A few committed early in the evening, but most would turn their noses up at my offering, or so I thought. That’s when I decided to investigate how to better close the deal with fish that inspect my baits, but turn away.


What I learned was surprising. Many times, especially in the case of finicky panfish like perch and crappie, the fish will hit without even sending a vibration up the line. A quick inhale and exhale of the bait and the fish moves on, knowing something isn’t quite right with the glowing blue hook or the funny-acting minnow. This action doesn’t budge a bobber and rarely moves a rod, leaving anglers in the frustrating situation of asking themselves why the fish didn’t hit when in reality, it did.


Nothing new



St. Croix's new Legend series of spring bobber rods come with light (pictured), medium, and heavy spring bobbers for all types of fishing
Looking to cure my panfishing predicament, I investigated deeper into the growing realm of finesse ice fishing and read some more on a simple invention - the spring bobber. I never had the need for one before this time because I had never been overly-frustrated by uncatchable blips on the Vexilar. I figured I would give it a shot and acquired, through a well-placed Valentine’s Day hint to my girlfriend, a 24-inch light action St. Croix Legend spring-bobber rod.

Coming equipped with a three-inch spring bobber and a solid carbon blank and cork handle, I knew the name alone meant the rod would be high quality. Designed by renowned panfish angler Greg Wilczynski specifically for St. Croix, the rod looked to be the answer to that mysterious question as to why the fish weren’t hitting.


A new perspective


As we set up on the ice that weekend, I tied on the smallest thing I had in my tacklebox - a size 12 nymph I had crafted out of orange dubbing and peacock herl - and the tiniest split shot I had available. The fish rolled through and several passed on the traditional opening-hour offerings such as Genz worms and rattle spoons. As day broke over the frozen feeder creek, I prepared to try the spring bobber rod for the first time. I tipped the nymph with a wax worm and lowered my offering down the hole. Watching the fly and weight on the Vexilar, I held them a few inches off of the bottom. Tapping the spring bobber with my index finger, I saw a faint orange line rise from the creek bed. I held the rod steady. The spring bobber moved downward just slightly, less than an eight of an inch, once…then twice. I snapped a hookset and felt the resistance of what would turn out to be a fat 9-inch perch.


The day would be cool and unstable, and the fishing would be tough. With my tiny flies and jigs and the spring bobber rod, I could detect more hits than my fishing buddies. And by giving the fish a smaller snack, instead of a bigger meal, I would land about two dozen perch, with seven keepers.


A majority of the success that day - and in my perch fishing trips since - came from having the spring bobber to detect the tiniest of bites in a winter that has produced a less-than-aggressive angling environment.


Spring bobber options



Fishing Reels
In addition to the springs that come built in to St. Croix’s Legend series of rods, the company offers a variety of sizes and sensitivities that can be ordered from their website (www.stcroixrods.com) or purchased at many sporting goods stores. Other companies such as HT Tackle (www.htent.com) offer free-standing spring bobbers for sale that can be attached to the end of your favorite ice rod to help with hit detection. They also carry a smaller price tag than purchasing a new rod.

Whatever you choose to help with finicky panfish as winter wears on, a spring bobber is a simple and effective way to downsize your baits, take the questions out of angling, and help you ice more fish…in our outdoors.





http://www.bucketrack.com/THEJig.html
IF IT'S WET...IT'S CATCH'N FISH
CrappieKeith
Senior Member
Joined 03/27/2006
Posts:3862

CrappieKeith's blogs, pictures and recent posts
Daily Subscription Msg 2 Posted: 10:07 AM 10/13/06 (CST)
Here is another article worth reading.
Ten Ice Fishing Tips and Techniques
Author: Steve Ryan



Everyone can stand to catch a few more panfish through the ice. However, ice anglers typically settle into a routine when they head out onto the ice. They catch several fish and then the action slows down or stops entirely. Maybe they change depths, colors, or holes a few times but that is about it. Once they stop catching fish based upon this routine, they quit and blame it on the fish - "they just stopped biting." Prior to muttering this phrase again, try the following tips and techniques.

1. Vertical to Horizontal. The style of one's ice jig is just as important as its color. Most anglers are accustomed to using a tear-dropped shaped jig that hangs vertically in the water, such as Jammin' Jigs Beetle or Teardrop jig. When fish stop biting vertical jigs, switch to a jig that hangs horizontally such as a Jammin' Jig Bobber Fry. I have found that crappies and perch generally bite better on a horizontal jig. To observe a wide selection of both horizontal and vertical ice jigs on the internet, check out www.jamminjigs.com.

2. Line Twist. Most anglers only move their jig in an up and down jigging motion. Fish become accustomed to this presentation and stop reacting to it. For a change of pace, try holding the line between your index finger and thumb. Next roll or twist the line between your fingers. This will cause the jig to spin in the water while remaining at the same depth. Also try moving the jig around the perimeter of the hole without imparting any up and down motion on the jig. Fish respond especially well to this technique in shallow water.

3. Bait to Plastic. Give the live bait a break and go exclusively to finesse plastic lures. As unlikely as it may seem, bluegills and other panfish will eventually tire of live bait. When this happens, switch to a tiny 1/80 round head jig with a sliver of plastic hooked on it. The finesse plastic tails of these tiny jigs quiver and shake with even the slightest movement of the rod tip. Finesse plastic jigs are also excellent search jigs and perform great in clear water.

4. Bounce the Bottom. An excellent way to add a few more jumbo perch to the bucket is to allow the jig to bounce off the bottom of the lake. Perch feed predominantly within a few inches of the bottom. By allowing the jig to bounce off the bottom, the small cloud of bottom debris and sound created by this action will attract fish from a distance. This trick also works for bluegills. At certain times, it is even more productive to allow the jig to hit the bottom and then lie at rest on the bottom. To use this approach, a spring bobber is helpful. The jig should just barely rest on the bottom of the lake, with enough of the jig's weight on the spring bobber to hold it half way down. When a fish takes the bait, it will typically rise with the jig and cause the spring bobber to go up.

5. Looking Down the Hole. For a stiff neck and a few more fish, try staring down the hole and watching as fish take the bait. This approach is excellent for learning how fish respond to various baits and jigging techniques. It is also an excellent way to take larger bluegill, perch and suspended crappie. Big bluegills have a way of hovering in front of a bait for several seconds before inhaling it and then quickly spitting it out. Since this happens so quickly and barely moves the line, a fixed float or even a spring bobber will often not detect this type of bite. One's only hope of catching these fish is to be looking down the hole and setting the hook once the fish inhales the jig. This tip also works great for suspended crappies. In both cases, brightly colored jigs that hang horizontally work best since they are visible at greater depths and in stained water.

6. Chum. To get an added advantage over other ice anglers, try chumming. Take a few extra wax worms, spikes, or minnows, crush them and drop them down the hole. This trick will not only attract more fish to one's area but will also get fish feeding more aggressively.

7. Change Sizes. When action slows, instead of changing colors, try changing the size of one's jig. This tip works both ways - switching from a smaller to a larger jig and from a larger to a smaller jig. One of my favorite ice fishing jigs is a red and chartreuse size 10 Teardrop by Jammin' Jigs. After catching as many fish as I can on this jig, I will switch from the size 10 Teardrop to the size 6 Teardrop which is nearly twice as big but in the exact same color. This often results in catching a few bigger bluegills. As a final matter, I will switch to the ultra small size 12, Teardrop jig and will catch a few more fish that would not take the other two sizes.

8. Set the Rod Down. When fishing with a spring bobber rod like Frabill's new Panfish Popper rod, a simple way to catch a couple extra fish is to set the rod down and allow the bait to sit totally motionless. Even if you think that you can hold the rod totally motionless in your hand, place the rod down on the ice or in a rod stand to catch a few more fish.

9. Cover the Hole. In shallow water, cover the hole with ice shavings to block out light penetration into the water. This applies in both clear and stained water lakes. In stained water, the use of a glow in the dark jig also works well with this approach.

10. PowerPro. For deep water panfish, do not use ultra light monofilament line. Two pound test or lighter monofilament line has so much stretch that it is difficult to detect light bites or to set the hook in depths greater than 20 feet deep. The key to catching more fish in deep water is to use a super line. The most effective of these lines for ice fishing is PowerPro line. PowerPro makes a line with the diameter of one pound test monofilament but with the strength of eight pound test. In addition, PowerPro line has nearly no stretch and is extremely abrasion resistant. This lack of stretch means one can feel more bites and hook more fish in deep water.

The next time you are on the ice and are a few fish short of a fish short of a limit, instead of uttering those dreaded words ("The fish just stopped biting"), try the above tips and techniques.



http://www.bucketrack.com/THEJig.html
IF IT'S WET...IT'S CATCH'N FISH
ryanc
Senior Member
Joined 07/01/2006
Posts:933

ryanc's blogs, pictures and recent posts
Daily Subscription Msg 3 Posted: 06:17 PM 10/13/06 (CST)
CK why do you type so much?





SEE YOU NEXT TIME GOT TO GO


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
BigBite
Senior Member
Joined 08/17/2004
Posts:1544

BigBite's blogs, pictures and recent posts
Daily Subscription Msg 4 Posted: 11:32 PM 10/14/06 (CST)
Good articles, CK...




sportsnut218
Senior Member
Joined 05/15/2005
Posts:1259

sportsnut218's blogs, pictures and recent posts
Daily Subscription Msg 5 Posted: 12:16 AM 10/15/06 (CST)
He didn't TYPE them ryan.. it's called copy/paste .. since he credited someone else for the article.



Even a BAD day of fishing is better than a good day of work; paydays excluded!

My Photography Website, includes sports and outdoors pictures

My Photos Blog, I update my website in blog entries.

ryanc
Senior Member
Joined 07/01/2006
Posts:933

ryanc's blogs, pictures and recent posts
Daily Subscription Msg 6 Posted: 07:49 AM 10/15/06 (CST)
O ok thanx for telling me. cool smiley





SEE YOU NEXT TIME GOT TO GO


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
spring bobbers are deadly - - - 6 messages. Showing 1 through 6.
You Are Currently Viewing - Minnesota Fishing Forum  

New? - Register Here

No Obligations - Click Here for more information. Login

Main Forum Page     |     Top of This Forum     |     My Fishing Pals Home
Members Browsing
the Forums:
    hArte     kraeflanum22     Mark Martin     SUAF    
Users Online:4
Guests Online:122
Total Online: 126


Terms and Conditions